22. Juli 2015

4 iOS Rules to Break (Nielsen Norman Group)

Following style guides is almost always recommended. But there are some cases where the “official” design does not work well in practice. Nonetheless, for reasons unknown—maybe the recommendation was a trade-off, it wasn't thoroughly researched, or it seemed to be the best possible a solution to a very difficult design challenge—it still made it in the style guide. (nngroup.com)

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How Two Bored 1970s Housewives Helped Create The PC Industry (Benj Edwards)

In April 1977, Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak rented a booth at the formative industry conference for the personal computer, the First West Coast Computer Faire in San Francisco. They were there to launch Apple's first breakthrough machine, the Apple II. (fastcompany.com)

Brainstorming UX Design Strategies with Toy Bricks (Gokul Rangarajan)

A great team is all the time humble and have the ability to listen to everyone, facilitating freedom to communicate each member’s thoughts and perspectives irrespective of hierarchies, which in turn would help build a great product. UX should not be a single designer or design team’s concern, but the complete development team needs the understanding of why, what & who they are developing this product for. Rather, now adays UX is conceived and misinterpreted as a Tool driven deliverable or look and feel improvisations. Instead the entire team with all stakeholders on board should be involved in solving major UX problems. (medium.com)

19. Juli 2015

Well-designed interfaces look boring (Matthew Ström)

3 billion people used the internet for the first time in the past decade. Can you imagine what that was like? When I began using the internet, the web was pretty much just text. Interface design required finagling websites from knots of spreadsheet-like tables, and even the most sophisticated designs couldn’t do much more than blink and display images. Now, 37% of the world has the internet literally at their fingertips, allowing them to manage their finances and healthcare, communicate in real-time using pictures and videos, and purchase everything from hamburgers to houses. Complex functions require complex interfaces; so how has interface design changed to accommodate? (medium.com)

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The rise of the “Full Stack” Designer and the tools he uses (Eden Vidal)

When I had just started as a web designer, I already had some experience with front-end development. So instead of treating web design as coloring pages for kids (which sometimes young designers do), I wanted to take part in the entire process — from concept to design to actually solving world problems (first world..) — and I wanted to code it on my own, as I could. (medium.com)

Meaningful Design for Apple Watch (Peter Lewis)

LIKE EVERY OTHER Apple-loving, early-adopting tech nerd, I’d set my alarm for 3:00am EST, April 10. It was pre-order time, and just a few more weeks until I could finally try out my new Apple watch. I was skeptical; it was their first major new product category in 5 years, and the first without Steve Jobs’ fingerprints all over it. I was concerned by reports that Apple had first decided wearables would be important, and then tried figure out what they could be useful for. But as a designer, I wanted to understand from firsthand experience where it fit in my life, and how to design for it. So there I was in the middle of the night, feverishly refreshing the Apple store app, tapping in my credit card information. By 3:03am the model I’d selected was sold out. (medium.com)

Dropdowns Should be the UI of Last Resort (Luke Wroblewski)

All too often mobile forms make use of dropdown menus for input when simpler or more appropriate controls would work better. Here's several alternatives to dropdowns to consider in your designs and why. (lukew.com)